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Year-long Fellowships include $65K salary + medical and dental benefits. (300 × 42 px) (5)

DEADLINE: Monday, February 20, 2023 at 11:59pm PST

WHO WE ARE 

18th Street Arts Center in Santa Monica, CA has been fueling the impact of artists on society since 1988. Conceived as a radical think tank in the shape of an artist community, we are a globally recognized catalyst for deploying artistic imagination to meet society’s needs. We curate projects where artists and the public directly engage in creating experiences and partnerships that foster positive social change.

18TH STREET ARTS CENTER CALIFORNIA CREATIVE CORPS PROJECT

18th Street Arts Center is seeking 40 California artists and culture bearers (collectively known as ‘artists’) to develop impactful arts and culture projects that foster community wellbeing in regions throughout the state that are located in California Healthy Places Index (HPI) Quartile 1 ZIP codes. If you are an artist or culture bearer already working to strengthen community wellbeing in California, or if you would like to become an artist doing this kind of work, we strongly encourage you to pitch your idea. 

If selected to be one of the 40 artists in the first-round cohort, you will receive professional coaching to compose your full project and budget, along with a $1,000 stipend. Coaching will be provided at no cost, by public art and community engagement specialists, between February and March 2023.  

All 40 first-round proposals will be reviewed, and of those 40, 18 will be chosen to be fully realized and funded community engagement art projects. Each of the final 18 artists will receive a year-long salary of $65,000, one year of medical and dental insurance (at no cost to the artist), the option to join 18th Street Art Center's SIMPLE IRA plan with employer match for one year, and production costs for their community art project from July 2023 - July 2024.

The 18 funded Community Engagement Art Project artists will form a year-long cohort whose projects will contribute to a statewide California Culture Map. 18th Street Arts Center believes culture mapping is essential infrastructure for successful collaboration between arts and culture producers and community leaders seeking to foster well-being among neighbors at the local level.  

ELIGIBILITY

Research shows that women and individuals from underrepresented backgrounds often apply only if they meet 100% of the qualifications. If much of this RFQ describes the work you do, then you are highly encouraged to apply.

This project is open to working artists and/or culture bearers/makers living or working within California in a Quartile 1 ZIP code, located on the California Healthy Places Index (HPI). Please reference the eligible HPI ZIP codes here. Using the “search function” (macOS: +f / windowsOS: ctrl+shift+f) you can search for a county, city, or zip code. 

Projects must address one of the four state-mandated “Impact” areas:

  1. Public health awareness messages to stop the spread of COVID-19
  2. Public awareness related to water and energy conservation, climate mitigation, and emergency preparedness, relief, and recovery
  3. Civic engagement, including election participation
  4. Social justice and community engagement

An artist, culture bearer/maker (‘artist’) is someone who regularly engages in artistic or cultural practice to: express themselves with the intention of communicating richly to or sharing with others; pass on traditional knowledge and cultural practices; offer cultural resources to their communities; and/or co-organize and co-create within communities toward social impacts. 

Artistic and cultural practices include but are not limited to: craft, dance, design, film, literary arts, media arts, music, oral traditions, social practice, theater, performance art, traditional arts, visual arts, and interdisciplinary arts.

PROJECT SCORING

All qualified RFQ submissions will be reviewed based on the weighted criteria listed below, which corresponds to information requested in various sections of the proposal: 

Note: Only applications that are complete, and proposed to take place in a Quartile 1 ZIP code on the California Healthy Places Index will be reviewed. 

  • Evidence of desired qualifications, competence, and direct experience - 30 points
    • The artist’s CV and work samples demonstrate full understanding of their practice – the tools, materials, and processes.
  • Community engagement experience/plans - 10 points 
    • The artist’s CV demonstrates prior community engagement or organizing practices. 
  • Experience completing public art projects of this scale - 10 points
    • Has the artist led other projects at this scale? If not, will they be able to scale up from past works?
  • Evidence of working relationship with the community the artist proposes to engage -  20 points
    • The project idea addresses something the artist’s chosen community has been seeking. How will their project support a need for the community, and will the community be willing to participate? 
  • Strength of proposed programming plan - 30 points
    • Has this project been executed before in other communities and is there a precedence of the project from others in the field?

Projects that do not take place in a Quartile 1 community on the California Healthy Places Index or do not select 1 of 4 ‘Impact’ areas will be disqualified.

DEADLINE: Your application must be received by Monday, February 20, 2023 at 11:59pm PST. Applications submitted after that time stamp will not be evaluated. 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Who can apply?

This project is open to working artists and/or culture bearers/makers living or working within California in a Quartile 1 ZIP code, located on the California Healthy Places Index (HPI). Please reference the eligible HPI ZIP codes here. Using the “search function” (macOS: +f/windowsOS: ctrl+shift+f) you can search for a county, city, or zip code. 

What is an artist or culture bearer?

An artist, culture bearer/maker (‘artist’) is someone who regularly engages in artistic or cultural practice to: express themselves with the intention of communicating richly to or sharing with others; pass on traditional knowledge and cultural practices; offer cultural resources to their communities; and/or co-organize and co-create within communities toward social impacts. 

Artistic and cultural practices include but are not limited to: craft, dance, design, film, literary arts, media arts, music, oral traditions, social practice, theater, performance art, traditional arts, visual arts, and interdisciplinary arts.

What is the three-round review process?

We designed this three-round application process in order to support emerging artists and culture bearers in developing their proposals.

Round OneInitial review of all applications resulting in 40 Round Two finalists.

Round Two, Project RefinementVia workshops and coaching provided by 18th Street Arts Center, Round Two participants will refine the creative vision of their project including a project timeline and a line-item budget to be presented to the Round Three review panel.

All Round Two participants will receive a $1,000 honorarium.

Round Three: Eighteen projects will be selected for support and funding via the California Creative Corps initiative.

Salary: $65,000
Artist’s or Culture Bearer’s project production budget: up to $50,000
Medical and Dental Benefits

Note: The remaining 22 projects not selected in Round Three can be submitted to other funders of your choosing. Our hope is to support your project with the development of a viable, ready-for-submission framework.

Who will review my application?

Round One project submissions will be reviewed by a three-person regional panel (Northern, Central, Southern California) composed of curators, cultural organizers, and civic leaders. A single panel will review projects that advance to Round Three.

What are the geographic requirements of this project?

All projects funded by the California Creative Corps initiative must take place and serve communities rated as Quartile 1 by the Healthy Places Index (HPI). This is specific to a neighborhood ZIP code, not just a city or town.

As an artist working in the community, you do not have to be a resident of the neighborhoods you wish to serve, but you must have a reasonable connection to the geographic location of your proposed project.

What is the Healthy Places Index?

The Healthy Places Index (HPI) is a tool created to advance health equity through open and accessible data. Evidence-based and peer-reviewed, the HPI supports efforts to prioritize equitable community investments, develop critical programs and policies across the state, and much more.

Neighborhood-by-neighborhood, the HPI tracks data on social conditions that drive health–including education, job opportunities, and clean air and water. This data is used by community leaders, policymakers, academics and other stakeholders to compare the health and well-being of communities, identify health inequities and quantify the factors that shape health.

What is a Quartile 1 ZIP code?

Quartile 1 regions are identified by the HPI tool which evaluates the relationship between twenty-three key drivers of health and life expectancy at birth. Based on that analysis, it produces a score ranking from 1 to 99 that shows the relative impact of conditions compared to other regions in the state. The HPI score rank is divided into four quartiles from less to more healthy: 0-25% is Quartile 1, 26-50% is Quartile 2, 51-75% is Quartile 3, and 76-100% is Quartile 4.

How do I find if my ZIP code is eligible?

Please reference the eligible HPI ZIP codes here. Using the “search function” (macOS: +f / windowsOS: ctrl+shift+f) you can search for a county, city, or zip code. 

Why is this opportunity only available to artists working or living in a Quartile 1 ZIP code?

The CAC California Creative Corps grant requires that all projects occur in a Quartile 1 ZIP code. It is important for 18th Street Arts Center to support regions that have had limited access to cultural and civic services, to highlight de-centered voices, and to recognize different forms of expertise. To find out more about our core values please see here.

Do I have to live in the same ZIP code I’ll be doing my project?

No. You do not need to live in the same ZIP code as you will be doing the project but it is highly suggested that artists live or work near or in the community they will be working in. 

Can my project in a Quartile 1 ZIP code include other regions?

Yes. Projects may include other ZIP codes that are not in the Quartile 1 region but the Quartile 1 region should be the focus of the project. 

I live in a small town with a limited arts and culture community. Will my proposal be competitive with other projects from artists in major cities?

Yes! You are exactly the kind of artist/culture bearer that 18th Street Arts Center is looking to support. Our regranting region is the entire state. There are 11 other regranting organizations who are focusing on specific regions, thus, 18th Street is specifically looking to identify and support artists and culture bearers that are not in highly served regions. We strongly encourage you to apply. 

I know how to engage people in my neighborhood/community with my art practice, but I don’t know how to evaluate or measure impact. Will this work against my application?

No. Through the project development workshop in Round Two, 18th Street Arts Center will help you design simple ways to evaluate the impact of your project that you can include in your proposal. 

Can I apply with other artists?

Yes. While the grant is currently formatted for 18 single individuals, groups and collaboratives are encouraged to apply as accommodations or adjustments can be made. 

How much money will we have for production costs?

Production budgets will be developed during the coaching sessions but will not exceed $50,000.

What are the virtual project refinement workshop requirements if I get into the short list of forty artists?

Artists are highly encouraged to attend all virtual coaching sessions, but we understand that it may be challenging given the short time frame. All coaching sessions will be made available via recording and artists who unable to attend will be asked to answer a few brief questions to review the content.

What are the four state-mandated “Impact” areas? 

  1. Public health awareness to stop the spread of COVID-19
  2. Public awareness related to water and energy conservation, climate mitigation, and emergency preparedness, relief, and recovery
  3. Civic engagement, including election participation
  4. Social justice and community engagement

Do I have to pick one of the four “Impact” areas? Can I decide on something different? 

All projects must connect at minimum to one of the four “Impact” areas—creative solutions are encouraged.

What is culture mapping?

Culture mapping is a process of identifying and documenting the resources, history, beliefs, people, and customs that make up a neighborhood through video, audio, photo, and other media. By collecting and analyzing data from various sources such as archives, surveys, focus groups, and interviews – culture mapping allows future users to gain a deeper understanding of a community and its lived experiences. 

Take a look at 18th Street’s Culture Map of Santa Monica’s Pico Neighborhood. 

This link to our partnership with USC demonstrates some of the ways that culture mapping research can strengthen the impact of your community stories.

What kinds of partners should I have for my project? Do I need to have them secured in advance for my application?

Libraries, community centers, galleries, local archivists, teen and parent groups, museumsmany spaces where the community gathers. You do not need to have the partners secured in advance, but will need to have them confirmed if you are one of the final 18 projects. 

Questions? Contact us below. 

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California Creative Corps is a pilot program funded by the California Arts Council as an engagement campaign designed to increase public awareness about issues of public health, water and energy conservation, civic engagement, social justice, and more. This activity is funded in part by the California Arts Council, a state agency.

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