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Mining Your Diamonds

Now that we are spending so much time inside our homes, we are looking inwards and reflecting about our role in the world and in the future. The pandemic has exposed what structures need to be reimagined and reshaped. The urgency to participate in this moment of change compels us to cultivate our true selves and the unique talents that come with that. The  more we are able to nourish ourselves, the more we can have an impact on the power of storytelling, artmaking, history, education, community, and more.

This week, we share with you a recording of Sultan Sharrief and Najla Sharrief’s workshop “Mining Your Diamonds”, which launched our Arts Learning Lab @ Home workshops for the summer last week. X-TRA’s Artists and Rights podcast, which launched Episode 5 last week and Episode 6 this week, features a conversation with artists Arshia Haq, Latipa, Mario Ybarra, Jr., and Marcus Kuiland-Nazario, our artist in residence and one of our founding artists, on artists and institutions as well as the importance of intimacy and engagement. In addition to that, listen to our Deputy Director Sue Bell Yank, Alexis Hyde and Erika Wong as they discuss the importance of arts education from a young age, funding, civil projects, community engagement and LARPing for the podcast HYDE OR PRACTISE. Last, as you enjoy the leisure of the weekend, listen to Dr. Alison Rose Jefferson’s presentation “African American Leisure Sites in California,” courtesy of Santa Monica History Museum’s Throwback Thursday series.

ARTS LEARNING LAB @ HOME: MINING YOUR DIAMONDS with Sultan Sharrief and Najla Sharrief

Last Wednesday we launched our Arts Learning Lab @ Home workshop with artist Sultan Sharrief and educator Najla Sharrief. In this workshop, Sultan and Najla led us through a series of creative exercises to help build our story. We explored how to tell our story, its setting, it’s important characters and more!

If you missed out, we have a recording for you! Discover your inner storytelling voice to show your true self. Watch the recording here. 

For Spanish speakers, find the recording here.

Tune in to the last workshop of the summer next Wednesday August 19 with David Horvitz as he reads his project Touch the Sky with Your Eye, a children’s book of ABCs in English and French! 

Register here.

LISTEN: X-TRA’s Artists and Rights podcast | EPISODE 5: The Brown Ceiling and Possible Futures & EPISODE 6: Behind the Closed Door: Intimacy, Collaboration, and Access

X-TRA’s Artists and Rights podcast is a conversation series exploring what art can do at the intersection of Los Angeles’s most urgent issues and artistic practice. Each session brings four artists together around a table. 

For EPISODE 5: The Brown Ceiling and Possible Futures,” artists Arshia Haq, Marcus Kuiland-Nazario, Latipa, and Mario Ybarra, Jr. discuss the artist’s role in relation to institutions; and how they are shaped by these institutions and they work to re-shape institutions. 

For EPISODE 6: Behind the Closed Door: Intimacy, Collaboration, and Access,” the same artists have a conversation about the importance of intimacy and engagement and how they create from that.

Marcus Kuiland-Nazario, one of the participating artists in both of these conversations,  is one of our artists in residence and one of 18th Street Arts Center’s founding artists. 

Listen to Episode 5 here. https://www.x-traonline.org/online/episode-5-the-brown-ceiling-and-possible-futures

Listen to Episode 6 here. https://www.x-traonline.org/online/episode-6-behind-the-closed-door

Read more about Marcus Kuiland-Nazario here: https://www.x-traonline.org/online/marcus-kuiland-nazario

LISTEN: HYDE OR PRACTISE: Season 2 Episode 2: The Sue Bell Yank Interview!

HYDE OR PRACTISE is a podcast where Alexis Hyde and Erika Wong discuss a range of topics on the art world ranging from market insights to weekly roundups. Season 2 Episode 2 features our very own Deputy Director Sue Bell Yank! In this episode, Sue, Alexis, and Erika talk about the importance of arts education from a young age, funding, civil projects, community engagement and LARPing. 

They also discuss Sue’s podcast Paved Paradise, which explores the history of housing disparity in Los Angeles. 

Listen here.

CHECK OUT: African American Leisure Sites in California

Santa Monica History Museum’s Throwback Thursday series last week featured Dr. Alison Rose Jefferson’s presentation “African American Leisure Sites in California.” This presentation illuminated the history of Santa Monica’s Bay Street Beach as well as other leisure sites in California. 

Watch the presentation and discussion here.

Happy 1 Year Anniversary to us!

This month marks our one year anniversary  at the Santa Monica airport hanger! So much has happened in that short amount of time. Although our galleries at the 18th Street Arts Center Airport Campus remain closed due to the pandemic, we hope you can enjoy the exhibitions from the comfort of your home through our virtual programs.

This week, sign up for our upcoming Summer series of Arts Learning Lab @ Home, family art-making workshops based on themes of place and identity. Enjoy a recording of last week’ s conversation Las Hijas de los Días: Postfeminism in the Diaspora” with Fiamma Montezemolo and Sara Solaimani. To start off your weekend, get a sneak peek into Facing Darkness, an online exhibition of artwork made during the pandemic, which will be on view at 8th Street Arts Center’s website from July 27, 2020 to June 30, 2021.

STUDIOS BECOMING AVAILABLE: We have several studios at our 18th St & Olympic campus becoming available in the next six months. If you are a local LA-based artist looking for a longer-term studio rental, please fill out our local artist-in-residence application.

REGISTER: Summer series of Arts Learning Lab @ Home

Arts Learning Lab @ Home – Summer 2020
August 5th, 12th, and 19th
Wednesdays at 11:30am via ZOOM
Free with RSVP – full schedule here.

Para español.

Santa Monica, CA – For three consecutive Wednesdays in August (August 5th, 12th, and 19th) at 11:30am via Zoom, 18th Street Arts Center will launch their summer 2020 series of live online arts classes for kids and families schooling from home called Arts Learning Lab @ Home. The three upcoming workshops for Summer 2020 focus around place and identity, both concepts that have become extremely fraught in the midst of a global pandemic and a societal reckoning with structural racism and inequity. Artists Sultan Sharrief with Najla Sharrief, Audrey Chan, and David Horvitz will help students and families explore their own personal stories through art, reflect on their ideas of home, and think about language and cross-cultural empathy in new ways.

The workshops will be live interpreted in both English and Spanish.

REGISTER NOW.

[Caption: Audrey Chan, Community art workshop at Metro Regional Connector Halfway There Celebration in Little Tokyo, 2018]

WATCH: Las Hijas de los Días: Postfeminism in the Diaspora

Last week Fiamma Montezemolo, PhD in Anthropology and MFA in Art, and Sara Solaimani, PhD in Art History, Theory, and Criticism, deepened into the themes addressed in the artworks from the group exhibition Las Hijas de los Días —7 Female Views from the Margins, on view at the 18th Street Arts Center’s Airport Gallery from January 27, 2020 – August 7, 2020. The exhibition features work by Cristina de Middel, Eunice Adorno, Lola del Fresno, Luciana Abait, Doni Silver Simons, Sabine Pearlman, and Pamela Simon-Jensen.

Our diasporic socio-historical ties within a postfeminist era; and the migration of bodies, ideologies and disciplines are some of the topics addressed during this conversation. Throughout the talk, art historical and anthropological knowledge of our guests were interwoven with works by artists in the show, positioning these works within broader psychogeographical and historical contexts. 

This virtual conversation happened on July 17, 2020.

Watch it here.

Explore the exhibition here.

CHECK OUT: FACING DARKNESS | an online exhibition

Lionel Popkin, Six Positions on Uncertainty, 2020. Video still. Courtesy of the artist.

In our darkest hours, it is natural and human to seek connection with others, to face the darkness together so that we can imagine a brighter path forward. In our current pandemic-time of crisis and isolation, this instinct can feel thwarted, and lead us to even darker places. Art is one of the ways that communities can find resilience in isolation, a method of aesthetic communication that empowers both the artist and the viewer to transform the most difficult and paradigm-breaking experiences into new visions for the future. Even as the arts and cultural infrastructure in the US is in deep crisis, the work of artists reflecting on this time and its socio-cultural reverberations is even more necessary for binding us together and rebuilding our world. As Californians for the Arts director Julie Baker quipped “A first responder comes in and saves a life. A second responder comes in and helps rebuild a life.”

Artists are second responders, and this exhibition of 25 varied artists from 18th Street’s artist community present multivalent ways that artworks that address the human capacity to overcome hardships on both global and personal scales. From meditations on memory, investigations into the warped passage of time, working through fraught familial relationships, and grappling with fear and longing in a time of public health crises and inequities laid bare, the artists in this show address our current moment both obliquely and directly, with humor, melancholy, and uncomfortable propositions. Creation during this time feels nothing like luxury; rather it is deeply necessary in navigating the darkness ahead.

18th Street will host related online events over the course of the exhibition.

Participating artists include: Deborah Lynn IrmasBeth Davila WaldmanElham SagharchiGwen SamuelsRachel ChuDebra DismanM Susan BroussardLionel PopkinLeo GarciaAlexandra DillonGregg A ChadwickAmeeta NanjiYrneh GabonClaudia ConchaLuciana AbaitRebecca YoussefCrystal MichaelsonSusie McKay KrieserMelinda Smith Altshuler, David McDonaldJulia Michelle DawsonDaniela SchweitzerLuigia Gio MartelloniSheila Karbassian, and Joan Wulf

View the exhibition here.

[Caption: Lionel Popkin, Six Positions on Uncertainty, 2020. Video still. Courtesy of the artist. https://vimeo.com/424924716/ae5062a1bc]

Holding space for each other

History has always been built from our memories and the stories we tell each other. Communities that have suffered long-standing oppression have not had their stories equitably written, leaving crucial voices out of our collective narrative. In moving forward and building a future, we must honor these stories, and become our own storytellers. 

In this week’s 18@Home, we highlight the Sunrise Mourning Meditations at the Bay Street Beach this summer through our new initiative Community X Community

We also invite you to tune in TODAY for the conversation Las Hijas de los Días: Postfeminism in the Diaspora” where artist and anthropologist Fiamma Montezemolo and curator and critic Sara Solaimani delve into themes addressed by artworks from the group exhibition Las Hijas de los Días — 7 Female Views from the Margins. Live today at 1 PM PST via Zoom. Register here. 

Finally, we hope you can join Virginia Avenue Park and the City of Santa Monica’s series of Entrepreneur Workshops, which start today online at 2 PM PST. 

TUNE IN TODAY @ 1PM: Las Hijas de los Días: Postfeminism in the Diaspora 

Eunice Adorno, Falda Dinamita (Dynamite Skirt) 2019. Mixed Media, 94.5 x 86.6 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Kenji Barrett.

Conversation and Q&A with Fiamma Montezemolo and Sara Solaimani, Frida Cano (moderator)
July 17, 2020 | 1pm
Zoom/FB Live

Register here. 

18th Street Arts Center presents a lively dialogue between artist and anthropologist Fiamma Montezemolo and curator and critic Sara Solaimani, designed to deepen into the themes addressed in the artworks from the group exhibition Las Hijas de los Días —7 Female Views from the Margins. Our diasporic socio-historical ties within a postfeminist era; and the migration of bodies, ideologies and disciplines will be some of the topics addressed during this conversation. Throughout the talk, we will interweave the art historical and anthropological knowledge of our guests with works by artists in the show, positioning these works within broader psychogeographical and historical contexts. 

Explore the exhibition here.

Eunice Adorno, Falda Dinamita (Dynamite Skirt) 2019.
Mixed Media, 94.5 x 86.6 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Kenji Barrett

CHECK OUT: COMMUNITY X COMMUNITY: Sunrise Mourning Meditation

Sunrise Mourning Meditation at Bay Street Beach, Santa Monica, California on June 5, 2020. Organized by Arianne Edmonds and April Banks. Meditation led by Ali Simon. Photograph by Halline Overby. Courtesy of April Banks.

From 18th Street Arts Center Communications Associate Jeny Amaya:

For Community x Community, I would highlight the healing powers of Sunrise Mourning Meditation, a space to mourn, reflect, and celebrate Black life. I first met one of the event organizers, April Banks, when she was working as a lead artist with the Belmar History and Art Project, a civic commemoration project honoring the former African American neighborhood of Belmar that was destroyed and replaced by the construction of the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. On Friday June 19, 2020, I attended the Sunrise Mourning Meditation for Juneteenth, organized to honor the lives that have been lost, stories forgotten and work still yet to be done in creating equity for the African American community. In the context of a global pandemic that has disproportionately affected so many Black and brown communities, Sunrise Mourning Meditation becomes a crucial space for healing. In order to amplify and highlight Black spaces, organizers April Banks and Arianna Edmonds intentionally chose a historically Black beach in Santa Monica, Bay Street Beach, known as a haven for African-American communities amidst the Jim Crow era.

I asked April Banks a few questions about Sunrise Mourning Meditation – here is a brief excerpt:

Sunrise Mourning Meditation is a collaboration that came out of a conversation between Arianne Edmonds and yourself. What are some of the goals you all have with this project?

2020 has been a brutal year from deaths due to the pandemic to police brutality to economic hardship. We wanted to mourn together, to bear witness to our community pain, to provide a moment of levity, and to do it in the presence of nature. Both of us work in social and civic justice. So in addition to creating the collective space, we wanted to bring people together around a hidden Black history in Santa Monica. We were very intentional about gathering at Bay Street Beach/The Inkwell, to pay homage to our ancestors. We are grateful to Alli Simon for leading our mediations and for the people who have made an offering of music and song.

Sunrise Mourning Meditation at Bay Street Beach, Santa Monica, California on June 5, 2020. Organized by Arianne Edmonds and April Banks. Meditation led by Ali Simon. Photograph by Halline Overby. Courtesy of April Banks.

What would you like the community to know about Sunrise Mourning Meditation?

Grievance and grieving go hand in hand. Organizing, protesting and fighting for racial justice is never-ending hard work. We recognize our collective need to recharge and be silent for a moment. It has been a beautiful and unexpected journey. We are overwhelmed with gratitude for how these meditations have been received and for the contribution they are making to this political movement. We will continue for as long as it feels right and safe. Rest is revolutionary. Rest is sacred. And we deserve to rest.

Read April Banks’ full interview here, with Jeny Amaya’s reflections on her experience.

For updates on this project, follow Teaafar on Instagram.

TUNE IN TODAY:  What It Takes to Start Your Own Business with Virginia Avenue Park and City of Santa Monica

JULY 17TH, 2020 , 2PM-3PM (virtual event)
HTTPS://BLUEJEANS.COM/207729146

OR DIAL-IN +1.408.419.1715 MEETING ID: 207 729 146

Are you interested in starting your own business?  Join Virginia Avenue Park and Community Development Committee of the City of Santa Monica – Economic Recovery Task Force for the first in a series of Entrepreneur Workshops to learn about how to start your own business.  Share your business ideas and learn about the ABC’s of entrepreneurship from Kathleen Benjamin, one of our local Santa Monica entrepreneurs. 

 For more information on this event, contact Michael Jackson, michael.jackson@smgov.net or call 310-458-8688.

This event will also be in Spanish.

Confronting the Past

As monuments are being torn down all over the country, we are reminded that the past must be confronted in order for healing to take place. By understanding the stories of oppression that are currently taking center stage, we are able to better exercise empathy and solidarity, which are necessary for change.

This week, check out some of the stories of Santa Monica’s Black community and reflect how your own neighborhood is part of the historical quilt that makes up America. Finally, we hope you can join us next week on Friday July 17 at 1 PM PST for Las Hijas de los Días: Postfeminism in the Diaspora, a conversation and Q&A with Fiamma Montezemolo and Sara Solaimani, with curator Frida Cano moderating.

As we consider the future of Santa Monica, we seek to remember and honor what has gone before – not just houses and buildings, but neighbors, families, and friends that make up the communities and cultures that shape us. 

In “Between the Sea and the Church: Preserving Santa Monica’s Black Community,” a Story Table featured on our Culture Mapping 90404 project,  we focus on the black communities of Santa Monica. Some of this history is unknown or overlooked, but has left an indelible mark on our city. We delve into the memories of our elders (as well as the important research of present-day scholars) to explore how these histories continue to influence and shape the people of our community.

In this Story Table you will discover some information about:

Heart of the Community: The Churches

Read more about the historically African-American churches from the past and present that held space for Black communities in Santa Monica.

[Image Caption: Original Phillips Chapel building with CME Sunday School Convention of the Los Angeles District in front (1909). This is the first building for the Phillips Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church west of Texas. Shown in front are Bishop Charles H. Phillips (center right foreground) and the first pastor, Rev. James A. Stout (left foreground). Santa Monica Public Library Collection]

Displacements: Belmar Triangle, Freeway

Santa Monica’s  Civic Auditorium and the 10 Freeway are monuments that symbolize the displacement of Black communities in Santa Monica. Read how this history shapes Santa Monica in the present.

[Image Caption: Burning houses taken by eminent domain on Belmar Place between Main and Third Streets, north of Pico, on July 1, 1953. Photo by Fitzgerald, Clyde V. Santa Monica Public Library Image Archives]

Everyday Life: Bay Street Beach and Rosie the Riveter

From black leisure at Bay Street Beach to women in the WWII work force, read about Black everyday life in Santa Monica in the 1940s.

[Image Caption: Photograph from 1920-1940 from Shades of L.A. Photo Collection. Santa Monica Public Library.]

The Present

Black leaders continue to carve space for Black communities in Santa Monica. Read how Laverne Ross and her leadership started the Juneteenth festival here in Santa Monica and more.

This Story Table was researched, written, and produced for the web by Rocio Garcia (Getty Marrow Undergraduate Intern, Summer 2019) and Sylvana Gutierrez (China University, Hong Kong Practicum Intern, Summer 2019). Many thanks to Robbie Jones (Historian), Alison Rose Jefferson (Historian), Kathy Lo (Santa Monica Public Library Research Librarian), and Carolyne and Bill Edwards (Quinn Research Center Founders) for their guidance in this project.

If you want to dig deeper into these stories:

Quinn Research Center

Alison Rose Jefferson Historian Publications

(Make sure to check out her book Living the California Dream: African American Leisure Sites during the Jim Crow Era, just released this year!)

Belmar History + Art

Imagine Santa Monica Collection: Images, Newspapers and Historical Maps

Phillips Chapel CME Church History

Santa Monica History Museum

“90404 Changing” Movie  
Watch the trailer here. (You can find the movie at the Santa Monica Library Pico Branch)

Interview Collection from Cultural Mapping 90404

“The Negro Motorist Green Book” Project by the Smithsonian Institute

TUNE IN: Las Hijas de los Días: Postfeminism in the Diaspora 

Eunice Adorno, Falda Dinamita (Dynamite Skirt) 2019. Mixed Media, 94.5 x 86.6 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Kenji Barrett.

Conversation and Q&A with Fiamma Montezemolo and Sara Solaimani, Frida Cano (moderator)
July 17, 2020 | 1pm
Zoom/FB Live

Register here. 

18th Street Arts Center presents a lively dialogue between artist and anthropologist Fiamma Montezemolo and curator and critic Sara Solaimani, designed to deepen into the themes addressed in the artworks from the group exhibition Las Hijas de los Días —7 Female Views from the Margins. Our diasporic socio-historical ties within a postfeminist era; and the migration of bodies, ideologies and disciplines will be some of the topics addressed during this conversation. Throughout the talk, we will interweave the art historical and anthropological knowledge of our guests with works by artists in the show, positioning these works within broader psychogeographical and historical contexts. 

Explore the exhibition here.

Eunice Adorno, Falda Dinamita (Dynamite Skirt) 2019. Mixed Media, 94.5 x 86.6 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Kenji Barrett

Happy Friday + 4th of July!

Artists help us carve out space and time to reflect on our lived realities by unfolding the stories that transform our perspectives, and shape how we experience the world around us. Artworks engage us in conversations that make it easier to imagine a more just and equal world, inspiring us to act towards change. Now more than ever, the reform of these oppressive structures feels more possible.

With that in mind, we invite you to watch our virtual exhibition tour of Las Hijas de los Días- 7 Female Views from the Margins, which focuses on the 7 artists in the exhibition. We then invite you to join the dialogue between artist and anthropologist Fiamma Montezemolo and curator and critic Sara Solaimani to deepen into the exhibition’s theme of postfeminism in the diaspora on July 17 at 1 PM PST over Zoom and Facebook Live. Finally, join us on Independence Day weekend for an arts intervention called In Plain Sightwhich will make visible the injustices of the largest immigration detention system in the world.

WATCH: Las Hijas de los Días | Virtual Exhibition Tour

Cristina de Middel

Eunice Adorno

Lola del Fresno

Luciana Abait

Doni Silver Simons

Sabine Pearlman

Pamela Simon-Jensen

In Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano’s book, Los hijos de los días (Children of the Days), he writes one story that reflects the feelings and vicissitudes for every day of the year. Inspired by this exercise, the gazes of seven women from 18th Street Arts Center, PhotoEspaña, and Arttextum reflect the spirit of our times, starting with photography as a medium of departure and expanding the field to include drawing, installation, and performance. Climate unrest, the physical displacement of the idea of home, and the removal of socio-historical ties that oppress women interweave the stories told by Cristina de Middel, Eunice Adorno, Lola del Fresno, Luciana Abait, Doni Silver Simons, Sabine Pearlman, and Pamela Simon-Jensen. This show was organized by Begoña Torres and 18th Street Arts Center’s Assistant Curator Frida Cano.

Explore the show here: https://18thstreet.org/event/las-hijas-de-los-dias/

TUNE IN: Las Hijas de los Días: Postfeminism in the Diaspora | Conversation and Q&A with Fiamma Montezemolo and Sara Solaimani, Frida Cano (moderator)

Eunice Adorno, Falda Dinamita (Dynamite Skirt) 2019. Mixed Media, 94.5 x 86.6 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Kenji Barrett.

Conversation and Q&A with Fiamma Montezemolo and Sara Solaimani, Frida Cano (moderator)
July 17, 2020 | 1pm
Zoom/FB Live

Register here. 

18th Street Arts Center presents a lively dialogue between artist and anthropologist Fiamma Montezemolo and curator and critic Sara Solaimani, designed to deepen into the themes addressed in the artworks from the group exhibition Las Hijas de los Días —7 Female Views from the Margins. Our diasporic socio-historical ties within a postfeminist era; and the migration of bodies, ideologies and disciplines will be some of the topics addressed during this conversation. Throughout the talk, we will interweave the art historical and anthropological knowledge of our guests with works by artists in the show, positioning these works within broader psychogeographical and historical contexts. 

[Eunice Adorno, Falda Dinamita (Dynamite Skirt) 2019. Mixed Media, 94.5 x 86.6 inches. Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Kenji Barrett.]

HELP END IMMIGRANT DETENTION: In Plain Sight

In Plain Sight is a coalition of 80 artists, (including our upcoming artist in residence Beatriz Cortez!)  fighting migrant detention and the culture of incarceration. The project will launch on July 4 and will make visible the injustices of the largest immigration detention system in the world.

The powerful roster of artists come to In Plain Sight with their respective practices intersecting this issue with their experience of migration, mass incarceration, history of concentration camps, xenophobia, displacement through colonization, borders, and the cyclical violence of internment camps. You can learn more about artists and why they’re participating by following the project on Instagram (Don’t forget to watch all the IGTV videos, which are short interviews with the participating artists) : https://www.instagram.com/inplainsightmap/

Here’s a link to the art intervention taking place in the coming days:

Https://xmap.us

Artists Reacting with Care, Compassion, and Stewardship

We face multiple health and humanitarian crises that have led to a reframing of our relationship to ourselves, each other, and our environment. Rather than focus on individual interests, artists we know and admire are often responding as a collective ecosystem engaged in care, compassion, and stewardship of the land. This focus on social change manifests in many forms, whether it be helping children through art-making, advocating for human rights, or facilitating reflective dialogue. 

This week, get involved by researching history through M Susan Broussard’s project US History (forgotten)and through an arts intervention with In Plain Sight focusing on horrific immigrant detention conditions. Finally, we bring you an Arts Learning Lab @ Home workshop with artist Marcus Kuiland-Nazario and an ARTIST X ARTIST reflection with Christopher Tin on Susan Kleinberg

And…WE ARE REOPENING on Tuesday, June 30! We invite casual exhibition viewers (masks on, and with strict check-in and physical distancing requirements) to view Las Hijas de Los Días and DRAWING CONNECTIONS at our 3026 Airport Ave. campus location. We are paying close attention to LA County reopening procedures, so will let you know if anything changes.

RESEARCH: US History (forgotten) 

Artist in residence M Susan Broussard created an artwork and website titled US History (forgotten) to address the gaps in basic American history that are rarely taught in public schools. Broussard has collected a series of resources, from first person accounts to archival materials, and put them in one place for you to explore. In her website, Broussard highlights US historical themes like Columbus and Slavery, Slave Ships, Founding Fathers and Slavery, Native Americans, The Civil War, The Underground Railroad, Reconstruction and Jim Crow Laws, Jim Crow Laws targeting Asian Americans, Forced Native Boarding Schools, The 1921 Fire Bombing of Black Wall Street, Tulsa, Oklahoma, and more! The website also includes a list of books to read, a list of organizations fighting for racial justice, a glossary, and resources on how to talk to children about these issues. 

Check it out here.

[M Susan Broussard, US History (forgotten), 2020  4×4 ft. Collage of oil paintings on canvas along with mixed media. (Feathers, leather, jute twine, cotton thread, cotton fabric, rice paper, galvanized wire, cotton bol, sewing pins, safety pins, paperclips, binder clip, paper tag and duct tape. Courtesy of the artist.]

HELP END IMMIGRANT DETENTION: In Plain Sight

In Plain Sight is a coalition of 80 artists, (including our upcoming artist in residence Beatriz Cortez!)  fighting migrant detention and the culture of incarceration. The project will launch on July 4 and will make visible the injustices of the largest immigration detention system in the world.

The powerful roster of artists come to In Plain Sight with their respective practices intersecting this issue with their experience of migration, mass incarceration, history of concentration camps, xenophobia, displacement through colonization, borders, and the cyclical violence of internment camps. You can learn more about artists and why they’re participating by following the project on Instagram (Don’t forget to watch all the IGTV videos, which are short interviews with the participating artists) : https://www.instagram.com/inplainsightmap/

Here’s a link to the art intervention taking place in the coming days:

Https://xmap.us

WATCH: ARTS LEARNING LAB @ HOME WORKSHOP | “Puppet Friends” with Marcus Kuiland- Nazario 

During this time of social distancing we can’t see our friends and playmates, so it is time to make some new ones. Marcus will lead a virtual craft workshop teaching you how to make puppets using everyday household items and objects, so that you can have a new friend to talk to, play with and keep you company.

Materials: Scissors, tape, markers, crayons, toilet paper tube, paper towel tube, fabric scraps, newspapers, magazines, buttons, construction paper, envelopes, paper, mop string, sponges, egg cartons, and anything else you want to add to your puppet.

Recommended Ages: All ages. Families encouraged to participate together. Children younger than 5 will benefit from an adult’s help.

 

Watch here in Spanish.

CHECK OUT: ARTIST X ARTIST: Christopher Tin on Susan Kleinberg

[Susan Kleinberg, Leap!, 2020. 1 min 30 sec. Video. Courtesy of the artist.]

“I’m interested in the loss of biodiversity as one of the side effects of climate change. The recent news stories of animals ‘reclaiming’ the lands the humans had intruded upon has sparked my imagination, and Susan’s latest piece Leap! tackles that very serious issue with the perfect balance between melancholy and humor.

What I particularly love is that the piece manages to capture a bit of childlike fascination with animals; especially as it centers around one of the most playful and intelligent animals, the dolphin. I think that art that tackles issues around manmade climate change can come off as preachy. And while loss of biodiversity is undoubtedly a serious subject, the messaging can get a little lost if it’s all doom and gloom. Susan manages to take a moment in our contemporary history–one that is ultimately revealed as nothing more than dream or fantasy–and make it highly relatable. She taps into the inner child in all of us with this lovely bit of wonderment. And ultimately that’s why I think the piece succeeds as a work of art: it tackles the greatest issue of the 21st-century–climate change and the accompanying loss of biodiversity–without become didactic.

I am actually in pre-production for my next big work, which also tackles the issue of biodiversity. Susan’s lovely little film is a reminder that wonderment and humor can also be efficient tools in getting the message across.”

Celebrating Juneteenth and Community Stories

In these tumultuous times, we are taking a moment to pause and reflect. What is important to me as an individual? What is important to us as a community? These are the questions we are all faced with during this moment of potential change. At 18th Street, we are finding inspiration in overlooked histories, intercommunity dialogues, personal meditations, and collective participation. 

In that spirit, we invite you to listen to the story of The Terryettesand Thelma Terry from our project Culture Mapping 90404, which we hope inspires you to check out her Women’s History Celebration that celebrated the process of writing her Wikipedia page. As you are reflecting about your values in this time of social change, watch Marcos Ramírez ERRE’s Arts Learning Lab @ Home “Let’s Think a Flag, Let’s Make a Flag” workshop so you can materialize those values into a beautiful flag! We hope you can join various Juneteenth celebrations this upcoming weekend, which we provide some information on below. Last, we invite you to participate in Community x Community, a campaign that aims to amplify the stories of the people, places, events, and organizations, both past and present, that define the culture of our neighborhood according to the people that live here. 

WATCH: Culture Mapping 90404 with The Terryettes

LaRita Brown and Dorothy Fuller-Dudley, former Pico neighborhood residents, collectively remember Thelma Terry, who sponsored The Terryettes, an African-American drill team in Santa Monica. LaRita and Dorothy remember Mrs. Terry as strict, patient and supportive. They describe being in the Terryettes as a highlight of their lives as they remember their practices, competitions, and uniforms. As a community leader, Mrs. Terry influenced many African-American youth through her work in teen recreation and athletics. Aside from sponsoring and training The Terryettes, Mrs. Terry hosted a range of activities at The Recreation Center, also known as The Rec, now Memorial Park. Her work with African-American youth and way of being had a lasting impact on many, which is why Virginia Avenue Park named one of its buildings after her.

Watch Now.

Read about Thelma Terry’s 2020 Women’s Day Celebration, which took place on Saturday March 7, 2020.

[Members of Dancing Diamonds and The Terryettes with Dee Wright as Thelma Terry for “Living History” at “Thelma Terry: Athlete, Educator, and Community Leader: A Women’s History Celebration” on March 7, 2020. Photograph by Leroy Hamilton. Courtesy of Virginia Avenue Park.]

WATCH: Arts Learning Lab @ Home | “Let’s Think a Flag, Let’s Make a Flag” with artist ERRE

Imagine, discuss, and create your own flag to represent your life philosophy, values, interests, and passions with internationally-renowned artist Marcos Ramírez ERRE. Join in discussions about color and symbols and their connection to ideas, things, and feelings — then construct your own unique flag and share what is most important to you.

Materials: White and various colored paper, color pencils, color pens or sharpies, magazines for cutting, scissors, glue, tape.

Recommended Ages: Best for ages 9-14, but all are welcome. Families encouraged to participate together.

 

Watch in English here.

Watch in Spanish here.

GO IN PERSON: The Sunrise Mourning Meditation

The Sunrise Mourning Meditation
Friday June 19, 2020 | 6:30 AM PST

Bay Street Beach, Santa Monica
Park in Lot 4 South. Meet us at the boardwalk at the bottom of Bay Street
Guided by Arianne Edmonds, April Banks, Alli Simon
FREE | For more info: https://www.instagram.com/p/CBV9Lj8hBND/

The first Sunrise Mourning Meditation was so well received, it’s happening again. Join Tea Afar, a nomadic storytelling project, as they create space to mourn together for a special Juneteenth memorial. They want to honor all those we’ve lost to the pandemic and to violence inflicted on black people in this country. Join them as they walk to the ocean to honor the ancestors and let it all out. Please wear all white, a face mask, bring a photo of someone you’d like to honor on your phone or printed, and bring flowers to offer the ancestors. They will do a social distanced walking meditation at the historical Bay Street Beach, the historically Black beach in Santa Monica, followed by a guided meditation by Alli Simon.

TUNE IN: Moving Forward Together: An Online Juneteenth Celebration 

Moving Forward Together: An Online Juneteenth Celebration
Saturday June 20, 2020 | 12 PM – 1:30 PM PST
FREE | RSVP HERE

Join the City of Santa Monica, founder LaVerne Ross, and community members for an online Juneteenth celebration on Saturday, June 20th from 12 noon to 1:30 p.m. to commemorate America’s second Independence Day, the day enslaved people in Texas were freed two years after the Emancipation Proclamation.  This year’s online event themed Moving Forward Together comes as our society considers the continued inequities Black Americans and Communities of Color have faced since that first Juneteenth.   

The program will be emceed by community member Kathleen Benjamin and will include: 

  • Traditional opening drum call performed by Chazz Ross 
  • Welcome and introduction prepared by founder LaVerne Ross and read by Kathleen Benjamin 
  • A panel discussion introduced by Eula Fritz, with presenters Dr. Kim R. Harris, Assistant Professor of Theological Studies at Loyola Marymount University and Captain Darrick Jacob of the Santa Monica Police Department 
  • Musical performance by Aaron Nigel Smith presented in collaboration with The Broad Stage    

To attend the event on Saturday, simply visit here. If you join from a mobile device, follow these steps: 

  1. Open this link: https://primetime.bluejeans.com/a2m/live-event/rtqzccdf  
  2. Download the app if you don’t have it already.  
  3. Enter event ID: rtqzccdf 

ABOUT SANTA MONICA’S JUNETEENTH EVENT

The City has been celebrating Juneteenth since 1992 thanks to the leadership of LaVerne Ross whose family had been celebrating Juneteenth from their days in Texas before she and her family relocated to Santa Monica in the 1950s. Juneteenth 2020 is presented in collaboration with Human Services Division, Santa Monica Public Library and Juneteenth Celebration Committee. 

For questions, email vap@smgov.net or call 310-458-8688.

CONNECT: Community x Community

In the spirit of our cultural asset mapping project Culture Mapping 90404, which highlights the history and cultural treasures of the Pico neighborhood of Santa Monica, we introduce COMMUNITY X COMMUNITY.

18th Street Arts Center is excited to collaborate with our Santa Monica community in centering traditionally overlooked stories, especially stories from Black communities, Indigenous communities, and other peoples of color. 

COMMUNITY x COMMUNITY aims to amplify the stories of the people, places, events, and organizations, both past and present, that define the culture of a neighborhood according to the people that live here. 

We invite you to nominate a person, group, place, event, or organization whose work around social justice, community building, or culture you would like to amplify using the form here.

We will include this in our 18@Home email, as well as social media and website.

If you are submitting an event, please let us know about it two weeks beforehand so we can help spread the word!

If you don’t already, follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter via @18thStreetArts.

If you have any questions, please email our communications associate Jeny at jamaya@18thstreet.org

To participate, fill out this form.

Amplifying Black stories of Santa Monica

Traditionally US history has prioritized the stories of rich white men while silencing, censoring, and erasing the stories of people of color, especially those from Black and Indigenous communities. We know that stories influence how we experience the world, and play into the tumult we are now experiencing as a nation.

We want to amplify the stories that have been ignored for so long and tell a different story, starting in our own neighborhood. This week, we’re visiting culturemapping.org, a community created oral history archive about Santa Monica’s Pico neighborhood, where 18th Street Arts Center is located, and prioritizing the perspectives of Black women in our neighborhood and sharing those stories with you. From racial covenants keeping people of color from living in much of Santa Monica, to the construction of the 10 Freeway displacing Black and brown families, we hope these stories influence how you see the world from a new perspective.

In addition, Joan Wulf shares her reflections on Maddy LeMel’s work via ARTISTxARTIST. Finally, we conclude this week’s 18@Home with Slanguage’s “Pandemic Printing” workshops with Mario Ybarra Jr. and Karla Diaz and hope you can join us for Marcos Ramirez ERRE’s “Let’s Think a Flag, Let’s Make a Flag” workshop TODAY as well as Marcus Kuiland-Nazario’s “Puppet Friends” workshop next Wednesday and Friday.

WATCH NOW: Black Oral Histories of Santa Monica

Longtime resident Harriette McCauley shares how her parents traveled to California in 1925 and their role in the emergence of Black churches in Santa Monica during that time. She also describes growing up in Santa Monica during the WWII wartime years and how Black communities showed solidarity with Japanese communities as they were transferred to internment camps.

Listen to her stories here:

Santa Monica in the 1920s-40s

WWII and Japanese Internment

Laverne Ross, founder of Santa Monica’s Juneteenth Festival, moved to Santa Monica in 1957 and recalls how the tone of the Jim Crow years was present in Santa Monica during that time. She also remembers how many people of color, especially Black people, were displaced due to the construction of the 10 Freeway. Ross also explains how the Juneteenth Festival first got started in 1992 in Santa Monica.

Listen to her stories here:

Community Leader Laverne Ross

Santa Monica’s Juneteenth Festival

Local historian and longtime resident Robbie Jones explains how at a time when there weren’t a lot of organizations in the city that worked with African-American youth, Thelma Terry was a Black recreation leader at Memorial Park in the 1940s who hosted a space for them. A building at Virginia Avenue Park was named after her because of her legacy. Jones also discusses Virginia Avenue Park’s programs for African-American communities, such as the rites of passage program for African American youth called “Visions and Images” which Jones developed with her late husband. It took place in the Thelma Terry Building between 1998-2012, mentoring youth personally and professionally. 

Listen to her stories here:

Thelma Terry

VAP Programs

Carolyne Edwards, long time former resident and founder of Quinn Research Center, talks about her uncle Alfred T. Quinn who grew up in Santa Monica and was the first African-American teacher hired in the Santa Monica School District. He was a collector and when he passed away, Carolyne Edwards and her husband Bill Edwards inherited his collection made up of important personal items. Realizing that the items weaved a story about the community and already having retired, Carolyne and Bill established the Quinn Research Center, whose mission is to preserve and collect the history of African-Americans in Santa Monica, Venice, and in the Bay Area. The Quinn Collection is made up of Alfred T. Quinn’s personal collection, collections contributed by community members, and the Belmar District’s collection. The Quinn Archives are located in her Mission Hills house. Contrary to the history that she was exposed to at school, this particular type of history and its process weaves a story for her, which is why her and her husband enjoy doing it.

Listen to her story here:

The Quinn Research Center

All original portraits by Sylvana Gutierrez.

CHECK OUT: ARTIST X ARTIST

ARTIST X ARTIST puts our artists at 18th Street Arts Center in conversation with one another. 18th Street artists are a network of global knowledge systems, and each artist represents their own node of knowledge, cultural practices, and artistic modalities. The discussions reveal ways we can connect as a global community to question our current conditions and imagine future potentials. 

Check out past installments here.

“Maddy LeMel’s Compromised draws me in on multiple levels – visually by pulling my eyes inside a cage to contemplate an old tool in captivity and psychologically by forcing me to question what is actually going on here. There’s mystery to Maddy’s work that calls on the viewer to supply a possible narrative. The tool represents strength, power and action, yet it is trapped inside a somewhat fragile cage rendering it useless. The piece suggests strength and fragility simultaneously. I’m inspired by her experimental nature and her use of found materials which keeps it raw and basic. This is what I strive for in my own work with my collaborations with the elements of nature. Maddy has been my studio neighbor for many years and I never tire of seeing her collection of cast off old goods on her back patio that will soon be repurposed into a poignant piece of art.”

WATCH NOW: Arts Learning Lab @ Home with Slanguage

Discover how to make prints at home with the materials you have lying around the house with Los Angeles artists Mario Ybarra Jr. and Karla Diaz. Making ink from coffee, chocolate milk and other homemade dyes — then use your “Chanclas” (sandals/ old shoes), and other materials from around the house to make amazing patterns and prints. Use what you have and try your best!

Materials: Colored liquids (coffee, juice, tea…), old sandals or shoes or foam or sponges, paper, cardboard.

Recommended Ages: All ages. Families encouraged to participate together. Children younger than 5 will benefit from an adult’s help.

Black Lives Matter. Now let’s take action.

BLACK LIVES MATTER.

18th Street Arts Center wants to express solidarity for those who are engaging in activism against racism and inequity in our country. We recognize our responsibility to address histories of oppression and resistance that shape privilege and power related to race, gender identity, class, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, ability and national origin, and have codified how we work towards this every day in our core values. Long term systemic change comes through profound inclusivity. We propose to work towards greater equity through our core values, programs, and more. We support the protests, and we also understand that there are many ways to be part of the social change ecosystem. It is hard, ongoing work. Every act geared towards beneficial change is an important act, and we strive as a staff to work towards that change every day in both our personal and professional lives..

With that in mind, we would like to provide you with educational and art resources on anti-racism as well as some ways you can take action today.

READ

Here is an anti-racism resource list that explores common questions and definitions on anti-racism and also provides a list of books to read on these issues as well as online resources, paid programs and memberships, ways to take action and leaders to learn from.

Link: http://antiracismforbeginners.com/

STRATEGIZE

We applaud our colleagues and members of our community who are on the streets. Being on the front line of protests is not possible for everyone, especially those that are immunocompromised, undocumented, chronically ill, disabled, or just don’t feel comfortable. You can support in other ways!  If you have trouble figuring out where you fit in the social change ecosystem, use this map and reflection guide created by Deepa Iyer of Solidarity Is and Building Movement Project to reflect and plan on how the best version of yourself can make a change.

Role in an Ecosystem PDF

Reflection Guide

DOWNLOAD

“Until We Are All Free: Racial Justice Art & Story Sessions, 2016” is a toolkit of art and story sessions that introduce the idea of racial justice and provide tools to address harmful attitudes about Black communities. This Activity Guide is comprised of art and dialogue sessions to encourage introspection, imagination, and visionary solutions.

 THE RACIAL JUSTICE ART & STORY SESSIONS TOOLKIT

courtesy of untilweareallfree.com

CREATE

The COVID-19 pandemic has amplified all the systemic changes that need to take place, from healthcare access to defunding the police.  “No Going Back: A COVID-19 Cultural Strategy Activation Guide for Artist and Activists”, is written by Janelle Treibitz, in partnership with Tara Dorabji, Favianna Rodriguez, Haleh Hatami, Chucha Marquez, and crystal marich for The Center for Cultural Power, and designed by Tony Carranza.  This guide shows us how to use the power of art and culture in times of crisis, especially when it comes to policies for survival and system change. Get inspired and put this guide into action!

No Going Back PDF

SIGN PETITIONS

George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Regis Korchinski-Paquet, Darrius Stewart, Jamee Johnson, Tamir Rice, and many other have died in the hands of police.  Demand justice for black lives by signing petitions! 

Here are a few you can get started with today. 

Black Lives Matter Petitions

DONATE

Donate and support mutual aid funds, victims, protestors, organizations, black owned businesses and other important places. Even if you don’t have money, you can share links of fundraisers with your friends and family or play a video project where 100% of the advertisement revenue this video makes through AdSense will be donated to the associations that offer protester bail funds, help pay for family funerals, and advocacy listed in the beginning of the video.

For more info on how to donate (with or without money) click here.

BUILD COMMUNITY

Get active with an organization in your community, neighborhood, city or county and organize around local issues! For those on the Westside, check out these two events happening in Santa Monica this weekend:

Sunrise Mourning Meditation | Organized by artist April Banks and Guided by Arianne Edmonds | Friday June 5 6:30 AM at Bay Street Beach (AKA The Inkwell) in Santa Monica (Park in Lot 4 South. Meet us at the boardwalk at the bottom of Bay Street.)

Let’s make space. Let’s mourn together for all those we have lost in the pandemic and from violence against people of color. Join us as we walk to the ocean to honor the ancestors and remember those we’ve loved and lost. We will do a social distanced walking mediation at Bay Street Beach in Santa Monica followed by a guided meditation by Alli Simon.

Please wear all white, wear a face mask, bring a photo of someone you’d like to honor on your phone or printed, and bring flowers to offer the ancestors. We have intentionally chosen a historically Black beach as we want to amplify and highlight Black spaces.

For more info: https://www.instagram.com/p/CA-x_h-BHN8/

“Another Noose: What’s Going on in Our Schools?”| Committee for Racial Justice | June 7 6:30-8:30 PM 

Recently, on the campus of Malibu High School, some White students made use of a noose in teasing and taunting a Black student, who subsequently stayed away from the school. Given the horrible role played by the lynching (most commonly by means of a hangman’s noose) of Black people by White people in American history, people of good will cannot help but be distressed and disturbed by such an incident. We at CRJ are very concerned, of course, for the well-being of the black student in the incident. We also believe that it is of paramount importance to investigate, not only the motives of the specific perpetrators but also the overall racial climate on campus and indeed of all schools in SMMUSD.

Event Info Here

RESEARCH: MORE RESOURCES

Black Lives Matter: https://blacklivesmatter.com/

LA Action Bail Fund (BLMLA’s partner for LA bail donations, 100% of donations go to the fund: https://linktr.ee/ActionBailFundLA

People’s City Council Freedom Fund: https://www.gofundme.com/f/peoples-city-council-ticket-fund 

Black Visions Collective: https://secure.everyaction.com/4omQDAR0oUiUagTu0EG-Ig2

National Bailout Fund: https://secure.everyaction.com/4omQDAR0oUiUagTu0EG-Ig2

Trans Justice Funding Project: https://www.transjusticefundingproject.org/donate-now/

We’re living in pandemic time.

As we continue to move through pandemic time we begin to recontextualize our relationship to our environments and remove the illusion of separateness. What happens to one community is connected to another. The practice of care is necessary to respond to the needs and concerns of our global communities. The social role of the arts is to offer platforms of solidarity and connection. Artists care for the communities they work in and the lives they touch. Sharing one’s concerns through art, performance and dialogue turns healing into a group effort. 

With healing through art in mind, we present to you a conversation around Patty Chang’s Milk Debt with artist Patty Chang, curator Anuradha Vikram with curator Asha Bukojemsky from Marathon Screenings moderating. Plus, don’t miss Pandemic Printing with Slanguage (Karla Diaz & Mario Ybarra, Jr.) happening TODAY at 11am. This week’s dose of ARTIST x ARTIST features Pamela Simon Jensen on Deborah Lynn Irmas and Dan S. Wang on Dan Kwong. Also, check out  Luigia Martelloni’s contribution in Time in the Time of Isolation. Last, we invite you to take a break from screens and to drive by some outdoor exhibitions featuring our artists.

TUNE IN: LIVE TODAY @ 11AM: Pandemic Printing with Slanguage

TODAY, Friday, May 29 @ 11AM
Slanguage (Mario Ybarra, Jr. and Karla Diaz)
Pandemic Printing

Fri. May 29 @ 11am – Spanish with English interpretation
Register here.

Discover how to make prints at home with the materials you have lying around the house with Los Angeles artists Mario Ybarra Jr. and Karla Diaz. Making ink from coffee, chocolate milk and other homemade dyes — then use your “Chanclas” (sandals/ old shoes), and other materials from around the house to make amazing patterns and prints.

Materials: Colored liquids (coffee, juice, tea…), old sandals or shoes or foam or sponges, paper, cardboard.

Recommended Ages: All ages. Families encouraged to participate together. Children younger than 5 will benefit from an adult’s help.

Learn more about future family workshops: https://18thstreet.org/artslearninglab_home/

WATCH NOW: Patty Chang’s Milk Debt Artist & Curator Conversation

With artist Patty Chang and curator Anuradha Vikram, moderated by curator Asha Bukojemsky of Marathon Screenings (In English with Spanish interpretation)

In collaboration with Marathon Screenings, we co-present a screening and artist conversation around Patty Chang’s Milk Debt, which will open at 18th Street Arts Center this Fall. Curator Anuradha Vikram, who initiated Chang’s presentation at 18th Street, will be in conversation with the artist, alongside curator Asha Bukojemsky of Marathon Screenings moderating.

Milk Debt is a multi-part video project of women pumping breast milk while reciting lists of fears drawn from different communities in various geographical regions around the world. 

Chang’s exhibition was originally scheduled to open to the public on May 16, but due to COVID-19, has been rescheduled for the fall. Chang reopened participation in her List of Fears in March 2020 after Safer at Home measures were instituted, and the videos showing as part of this livestream event were created from responses submitted during the pandemic.

Watch Now

DRIVE BY: OUTDOOR ART EXHIBITIONS THE WEEKEND OF MAY 30-31 (and beyond)

Artists on both campuses at 18th Street (18th & Olympic AND the Santa Monica Airport at 3026 Airport Ave.) and beyond are activating outdoor spaces with an astonishing array of mediums and installation. See what this creative community is engaged in making during quarantine in a socially-distanced, safe way.

DE-FENCE ART (Art in the Time of Isolation)
Organized and curated by Luigia Gio Martelloni 

The fence outside 3026 Airport Ave., Santa Monica
May 30, 2020 (Opening) – June 30, 2020

Participating artists include: Gregg Chadwick, Mara Colecchia, Claudia Concha, Julia Michelle Dawson, Lola Del Fresno, Alexandra Dillon, David Eddington, Joshua Elias, Francesca Forquet, Jane Goren, Yossi Govrin, Sheila Karbassian, Jeremy Kidd, Deborah Lynn Irmas, Susie McKay Krieser, Luigia Gio Martelloni, Crystal Michaelson, Ameeta Nanji, Gary Palmer, Sabine Pearlman, Elham Sagharchi, Daniela Schweitzer, Melinda Smith Altshuler, Alberto Vannetti, Clay White, Joan Wulf, Rebecca Youssef, Michele Castagnetti, Emily Van Horn, Lawrence D’Attilio

Art on view May 30th, from 12pm till sunset
The exhibition is visible from sunrise to sunset everyday
Please don’t visit the site at night

More information here.

Drive-By-Art (Public Art in This Moment of Social Distancing)
Organized by Warren Neidich, Renee Petropoulos, Michael Slenske and Anuradha Vikram

Featuring Dan S. Wang, Luciana Abait, Lita Albuquerque, Debra Disman, Yrneh Gabon, Marcus Kuiland-Nazario, Jeff Beall, and Dan Kwong from 18th Street Arts Center.

MAY 30th-31st: West of Western Avenue 
Times: 12-6pm + night viewings at select locations Saturday, May 30th, 8pm-midnight

More information here.

CHECK OUT: Luigia Gio Martelloni in Time in the Time of Isolation

Luigia Gio Martelloni made new work and wrote a poem about this time of isolation in the new publication organized by Cynthia Penna called Time in the Time of Isolation. 

TIME TRICK US…UNDER THE SAME SKY

The Trick of our (quarantine) TIME

a Threat Under the Same Sky

The Silence of this TIME

Transform our TIME

In a TIME of sorrow that change Lives. Distracted from Distractions by the coronavirus TIME

In the Process of Creativity

The silver lining Is a reflection in our TIME

A global United TIME

Throughout ZOOM TIME

( Luigia Gio Martelloni, April 2020)

Read more here.

CHECK OUT: ARTIST x ARTIST

ARTIST X ARTIST puts our artists at 18th Street Arts Center in conversation with one another. 18th Street artists are a network of global knowledge systems, and each artist represents their own node of knowledge, cultural practices, and artistic modalities. The discussions reveal ways we can connect as a global community to question our current conditions and imagine future potentials. 

For this installment of ARTIST X ARTIST, Rebecca Youssef and Gregg Chadwick reflect on the work of Joan Wulf and Dan S. Wang.

“I love the experience of entering Deborah Lynn Irmas’s studio. Her  luminous soft colored plexiglass paintings glow and float. With sure rhythmic patterns, they evoke a sense of light, uplift, and calm.  Underpinning repetition and order feels meditative, soothing and durable. Unbroken gently pulses with life. “

Dan Kwong | IT'S GREAT 2B AMERICAN: Letters+Preachin'

Dan Kwong | IT'S GREAT 2B AMERICAN: Visas+Navy Blue & Gold

“I am grateful for work that complicates ideas about belonging and national identity, particularly in pandemic times, when it is clearer than ever that borders are an obstacle to global solutions. Across its different segments IT’S GREAT 2B AMERICAN is equal parts mournful, joyful, nostalgic, and wry. The combination of different emotional registers corresponds perfectly to the transnational complexities of ethnic otherness and diasporic experience. Dan’s work inspires me to listen, to bear witness, to tell my stories, and to appreciate simple absurdities as the gifts that get us through life and hard memories.”

[Excerpts from Dan Kwong’s IT’S GREAT 2B AMERICAN. Written, produced, performed by Dan Kwong. Courtesy of the artist.]

Today we celebrate resilience.

Art, as a practice, sustains our histories, values and collective human spirit. Santa Monica’s original peoples understood this long before the development of California, utilizing art as a process to share conversation, form networks of support, and engage in collaborative activities. 

As part of Arts Month, Santa Monica artists, including 18th Street artists in residence Lita Albuquerque, Dan Kwong, and Marcus Kuiland-Nazario remind us of this by reciting a proclamation, originally created by Santa Monica Artist Fellow Larissa FastHorse, that responds to COVID-19 and art’s role in recording and responding to humanity’s resiliency and perseverance throughout time. 

Also, we present to you performance artists Beck + Col’s “Intro to Monster Movement” workshop, and encourage you to check out Alexandra Dillon’s interview on The Curator Mag, and Joan Wulf’s entry in the publication Time in the Time of Isolation. Next week, artists from both our campuses are participating in city-wide outdoor art exhibitions, so check out De-Fence Art and Drive-by-Art!

TODAY, we invite you to a livestream screening of Patty Chang’s Milk Debt. Chang reopened participation in her List of Fears in March 2020 after Safer at Home measures were instituted, and the videos showing as part of this livestream event were created from responses submitted during the pandemic. The films are on view until today at 1 PM, which will be followed by an artist conversation.

WATCH NOW: Arts Month 2020 Proclamation City of Santa Monica

For the past few years, City Council has proclaimed April as Arts Month in Santa Monica. This year, Santa Monica Artist Fellow Larissa FastHorse created an original proclamation in response to both Arts Month and the COVID-19 pandemic. The proclamation, as presented by current and former Santa Monica Artist Fellows, is a true testament to the value of the arts to our wellbeing and healing during this time of physical isolation.

Watch Now.

Learn more here: https://www.santamonica.gov/arts/artsmonth

TUNE IN TODAY: Patty Chang’s Milk Debt Livestream Preview Screening & Conversation

Livestream Screening: Wednesday, May 20, 12 pm- Friday, May 22, 1 pm
Artist Conversation: TODAY, May 22, 1 pm

With artist Patty Chang and curator Anuradha Vikram, moderated by curator Asha Bukojemsky of Marathon Screenings (In English with Spanish interpretation)

In collaboration with Marathon Screenings, we co-present a screening and artist conversation around Patty Chang’s Milk Debt, which will open at 18th Street Arts Center this Fall. Curator Anuradha Vikram, who initiated Chang’s presentation at 18th Street, will be in conversation with the artist, alongside curator Asha Bukojemsky of Marathon Screenings moderating.

Milk Debt is a multi-part video project of women pumping breast milk while reciting lists of fears drawn from different communities in various geographical regions around the world. 

Chang’s exhibition was originally scheduled to open to the public on May 16, but due to COVID-19, has been rescheduled for the fall. Chang reopened participation in her List of Fears in March 2020 after Safer at Home measures were instituted, and the videos showing as part of this livestream event were created from responses submitted during the pandemic.

Learn more here.

[Caption: Still of Patty Chang, Milk Debt, 2020. TRT: 10:24 min. Courtesy of the artist.
Still of Patty Chang, Fear List, 2020. TRT: 9 min. Courtesy of the artist.]

DRIVE BY: OUTDOOR ART EXHIBITIONS THE WEEKEND OF MAY 30-31 (and beyond)

Artists on both campuses at 18th Street (18th & Olympic AND the Santa Monica Airport at 3026 Airport Ave.) and beyond are activating outdoor spaces with an astonishing array of mediums and installation. See what this creative community is engaged in making during quarantine in a socially-distanced, safe way.

DE-FENCE ART (Art in the Time of Isolation)
Organized and curated by Luigia Gio Martelloni 

The fence outside 3026 Airport Ave., Santa Monica
May 30, 2020 (Opening) – June 30, 2020

Participating artists include: Gregg Chadwick, Mara Colecchia, Claudia Concha, Julia Michelle Dawson, Lola Del Fresno, Alexandra Dillon, David Eddington, Joshua Elias, Francesca Forquet, Jane Goren, Yossi Govrin, Sheila Karbassian, Jeremy Kidd, Deborah Lynn Irmas, Susie McKay Krieser, Luigia Gio Martelloni, Crystal Michaelson, Ameeta Nanji, Gary Palmer, Sabine Pearlman, Elham Sagharchi, Daniela Schweitzer, Melinda Smith Altshuler, Alberto Vannetti, Clay White, Joan Wulf, Rebecca Youssef

Art on view May 30th, from 12pm till sunset
The exhibition is visible from sunrise to sunset everyday
Please don’t visit the site at night

More information here.

Drive-By-Art (Public Art in This Moment of Social Distancing)
Organized by Warren Neidich, Renee Petropoulos, Michael Slenske and Anuradha Vikram

Featuring Dan S. Wang, Luciana Abait, Lita Albuquerque, Debra Disman, Yrneh Gabon, Marcus Kuiland-Nazario, and Dan Kwong from 18th Street Arts Center.

MAY 30th-31st: West of Western Avenue 
Times: 12-6pm + night viewings at select locations Saturday, May 30th, 8pm-midnight

More information here.

WATCH: Beck + Col “Intro to Monster Movement”

Stomp, sing, yodel, and wave as you discover a world of movement and sounds with performance duo Beck +Col.  Join them as they lead participants in an all-ages workshop activating guests bodies and voices- to develop a series of collaborative performances.

We took a break this week but we’re back next week! We have more exciting workshops that people of all ages can enjoy. Check out the schedule of upcoming classes and recordings of past classes here: https://18thstreet.org/artslearninglab_home/

Each class is also taught in Spanish and can be found here: https://18thstreet.org/artslearninglab_esp/

CHECK OUT: Alexandra Dillon’s interview on The Curator Mag & Joan Wulf in Time in the Time of Isolation

Artist in residence Alexandra Dillon talks with Romina Bertetti about the inspirations and processes that drive her to create surrealist artworks on found objects.

Read more here: https://thecuratormag.in/alexandra-dillon/

Joan Wulf made new work and wrote a poem about this time of isolation in the new publication organized by Cynthia Penna called Time in the Time of Isolation. Wulf’s poem:

 

a time out
                from our everyday routine
a time of
                survival and adaptability                                                                
a time for
                collective acknowledgement of mortality     
a time to
                reflect
a time of
                compassion and giving                                                            
a time for
                connecting with what we hold dear                                            
a time to
                wake up to nature. around us. within us

 

Read more here.

Thank you for seeing me, I feel so less lonely.

The arts can be transformative, even more so now when we’re alone together. Whether it’s repurposing objects for play, exchanging insightful conversation, or transforming fears into moments of compassion and solidarity, artists facilitate empathy. And empathy and connection are absolutely what we need right now.  

With transformative, empathic experiences in mind, this week we present to you experimental jazz musician and professional percussionist Shirazette Tinnin’s “A Better Use for a Spoon” workshop as well as our weekly series, ARTIST x ARTIST, featuring Rebecca Youssef on Joan Wulf and Gregg Chadwick on Dan S. Wang. 

Last, we invite you to a livestream preview screening of work from Patty Chang’s Milk Debt, which will be followed by an artist conversation next Friday.

WATCH NOW: Shirazette Tinnin’s “A Better Use for a Spoon” Workshop!

Experimental jazz musician and professional percussionist Shirazette Tinnin inspired us to discover the joys of drumming on things we can find around our home! Tinnin taught us how to construct and play a homemade drum set made from everyday materials like an oatmeal container, spoons, glasses, and much more! Here is a recording of that workshop.

Watch Now.

Arts Learning Lab @Home Spring semester is just getting started! We have more exciting workshops that people of all ages can enjoy. Check out the schedule of upcoming classes and recordings of past classes here: https://18thstreet.org/artslearninglab_home/

Each class is also taught in Spanish and can be found here: https://18thstreet.org/artslearninglab_esp/

CHECK OUT: ARTIST x ARTIST

ARTIST X ARTIST puts our artists at 18th Street Arts Center in conversation with one another. 18th Street artists are a network of global knowledge systems, and each artist represents their own node of knowledge, cultural practices, and artistic modalities. The discussions reveal ways we can connect as a global community to question our current conditions and imagine future potentials. 

For this installment of ARTIST X ARTIST, Rebecca Youssef and Gregg Chadwick reflect on the work of Joan Wulf and Dan S. Wang.

“From an outside perspective, I view Dan S. Wang’s involvement in the Wisconsin Uprising as a three part artistic exploration. First, there are the protest signs Dan crafted. Second, the community nature of the protests within the Capitol building were performance art of a political nature. Third, Dan’s writing during and after the events provides a timeline and gives us clues on how to move forward. I followed the 2011 Wisconsin Uprising closely. Twitter missives and email reports from my cousin Anne, who was in Madison protesting daily inside the Capitol Rotunda, kept me informed along with livestreams of the events. I began to see the global connections between the Wisconsin protests with Occupy Wall Street and the Arab Spring. The structural injustices in regressive actions by Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker and his cronies infuriated me. We needed to take a stand! If we lost, we would end up in a nightmare scenario… Well, we lost that battle. Now, with the current mismanagement of the pandemic and financial crisis by the 2020 White House the nightmare is real. Seeing Dan’s protest movement as art during the 2011 Wisconsin Uprising documented on his website brought me viscerally back to those struggles. Seeing Dan’s Wisconsin Uprising work has inspired me in our current political reality to continue with my protest paintings.”

 

Read more on the 2011 Wisconsin Uprising from Dan S. Wang’s perspective here.

Dan S. Wang on the Wisconsin Uprising for Creative Time Summit

“I’m really interested in how fire became an integral part of Joan Wulf’s work. Initially, I was attracted to the danger and excitement I associate with the concept of burning. Joan’s control over the medium is what stands out to me the most. I love the simple elegance and restraint of her quieter pieces. Her use of fire as a principle medium has influenced my practice and use of water as my preferred medium. I’m interested in the stark contrasts between Joan’s work and mine, but also the similarities.”

TUNE IN: Patty Chang’s Milk Debt Livestream Preview Screening

Patty Chang, Milk Debt, 2020. 10:24 min. Video still. Courtesy of the artist.
Patty Chang, Fear List, 2020. 9 minutes. Video still. Courtesy of the artist.

Livestream Screening: Wednesday, May 20, 12 pm- Friday, May 22, 1 pm
Artist Conversation: Friday, May 22, 1 pm

With artist Patty Chang and curator Anuradha Vikram, moderated by curator Asha Bukojemsky of Marathon Screenings (In English with Spanish interpretation)

In collaboration with Marathon Screenings, we co-present a screening and artist conversation around Patty Chang’s Milk Debt, which will open at 18th Street Arts Center this Fall. Curator Anuradha Vikram, who initiated Chang’s presentation at 18th Street, will be in conversation with the artist, alongside curator Asha Bukojemsky of Marathon Screenings moderating.

Milk Debt is a multi-part video project of women pumping breast milk while reciting lists of fears drawn from different communities in various geographical regions around the world. The title refers to the idea in Chinese Buddhism where a child is forever indebted to its mother for the milk she gave. Milk Debt is an arrangement that binds us to our history and to the earth, and is considered an unpayable debt. Biologically, breast milk is created when the body starts to produce the hormones prolactin and oxytocin – a hormone also produced when someone is in love. The performance acts as a type of ritual, with the performer channeling the fears of others into public speech. By speaking the fears, the pumper transforms them from the individual into the communal. In a time when people are being impacted by climate change, governmental policies, lack of resources, and pandemics, it is vital to find ways to connect to others, be inclusive and compassionate and find ways of making meaning in our world.

Chang’s exhibition was originally scheduled to open to the public on May 16, but due to COVID-19, has been rescheduled for the fall. Chang reopened participation in her List of Fears in March 2020 after Safer at Home measures were instituted, and the videos showing as part of this livestream event were created from responses submitted during the pandemic.

Learn more here.

[Caption: Still of Patty Chang, Milk Debt, 2020. TRT: 10:24 min. Courtesy of the artist.
Still of Patty Chang, Fear List, 2020. TRT: 9 min. Courtesy of the artist.]

We like to talk through things.

We’re serious about talking through things.

To dialogue means to “take part in a conversation or discussion to resolve a problem.” When we participate in dialogue, we create new knowledge together. As an organization, we feel it is necessary to work towards greater equity through dialogues that prioritize artists and our local community, centering the voices of those that are traditionally decentered. 

With dialogical relationships in mind, this week we present to you Gamesa conversation between curators Paul Pescador and Maura Brewer; as well as our weekly series, ARTIST x ARTIST featuring Yrneh Gabon on Lita Albuquerque and Gwen Samuels on Alexandra Dillon. Last, we also introduce you to our core values.

WATCH NOW: Games, a conversation with curators Paul Pescador and Maura Brewer

From April 29 to May 1,18th Street Arts Center live streamed Games, an online film festival centered around the idea of play, curated by Paul Pescador and Maura Brewer. Following the online screening was a live streamed conversation with the curators, followed by an audience Q&A. 

In the conversation, Maura Brewer and Paul Pescador guide us through an insightful overview of video art history and contemporary video art practices.  In discussion the artists provide their takes on the films on view in the Games screening. Through their transactions, the curators highlight how play can be a radical act within capitalism and reflect on its crucial role within the current pandemic.

CHECK OUT: ARTIST x ARTIST

ARTIST X ARTIST puts our artists at 18th Street Arts Center in conversation with one another. 18th Street artists are a network of global knowledge systems, and each artist represents their own node of knowledge, cultural practices, and artistic modalities. The discussions reveal ways we can connect as a global community to question our current conditions and imagine future potentials. 

For this installment of ARTIST X ARTIST, Gwen Samuels and Yrneh Gabon reflect on the work of Alexandra Dillon and Lita Albuquerque. Check out past installments here.

“Alexandra Dillon’s Adeline and Mariah makes me think about gloves in general. Glove etiquette evolves to fit the sensibilities of the times. White gloves are a rare fashion accessory not part of our everyday wardrobes yet now we see people wearing protective gloves as a deterrent for spreading or catching the virus. What if they evolved into a more personal fashion? This artwork stands out for me because we are in different times and Alexandra’s White Gloves with Faces of Two Women tells a story that creates a comparison for me of then and now. Her work inspires me because she is doing something I haven’t seen before and I am attracted to artists that work with materials in unexpected ways. I like how she combines her classical painting techniques on unusual painting surfaces and objects to tell a story.”

“As a performance artist working publicly outdoors, I respond to  Lita Albuquerque’s large-scale performative sculpture “Spine of the Earth”  with inspiration and interest  and find the work to be socially engaging. All aspects of this project stands out to me, especially because I’m currently working collaboratively on a project that has large numbers of people within a spacious landscape. I feel that our works and practice are somewhat in conversation with each other.”

READ: Our Core Values

Recently, 18th Street Arts Center went through a dialogical, iterative process with board, staff, partners, and our greater community to codify values we feel are core to our organization. We made a commitment to these values collectively, in our programming, staffing, and infrastructure.

Read them online here.

Celebrating empathy and play

Lately we’ve been thinking about the role of artists in society. Artists help us question conditions, reconsider values and provide platforms of discussion. Whether engaging in conversation or celebrating moments of empathy and play, artists lead us to create connections and new knowledge together. 

In that spirit, this week we bring to you Games, an online film festival centered around the idea of play, curated by Paul Pescador and Maura Brewer, Yrneh Gabon’s reading of Sophie’s Masterpiece: A Spider’s Tale for Arts Learning Lab @ Home, written by Eileen Spinelli and illustrated by Jane Dyer, and ARTIST x ARTIST, a campaign that puts our artists at 18th Street Arts Center in conversation with one another.

TUNE IN: Games, an online art film festival for families

Artists Paul Pescador and Maura Brewer bring together a selection of artworks from Los Angeles and Latin America that consider the theme of play through Games, an online screening of videos that loop on the hour.  Today, we are stuck at home, bored and passing time, waiting for life to start up again. The videos in this screening explore the possibility of play in daily life, imagining the world as a space of limitless potential. Expect bouncing balls, fussy puppies and a tropical paradise.   

Artists include Yvonne Buchanan, Micol Hebron, Julie Orser, Ivo Loyola, Junghun Lee, Morgan Waltz, Case Esparros, and Rodri & Lenny.

Accompanying the screening will be a live stream conversation with the curators TODAY on Friday, May 1, 1pm.

[image caption: Micol Hebron, Dare You, 2007, 9:26 min. Video still.]

 

 

 

 

WATCH NOW: Yrneh Gabon | Tomorrow’s People

Last week, artist in residence Yrneh Gabon read to us Sophie’s Masterpiece: A Spider’s Tale, written by Eileen Spinelli and illustrated by Jane Dyer, for Arts Learning Lab @ Home. In this children’s story, Sophie, who is a spider and an artist, finally finds the inspiration and determination to create her masterpiece! Through storytelling, Gabon, who is also a social practice artist, poetically reminds us what role we have in the world as tomorrow’s people.

If you couldn’t make it to the live reading over Zoom, don’t worry, we recorded it for you. 

Watch it in Spanish here: https://18thstreet.org/artslearninglab_esp/

To check out the schedule of upcoming Arts Learning Lab @ Home  workshops: https://18thstreet.org/artslearninglab_home/

CHECK OUT: ARTIST X ARTIST

ARTIST X ARTIST puts our artists at 18th Street Arts Center in conversation with one another. 18th Street artists are a network of global knowledge systems, and each artist represents their own node of knowledge, cultural practices, and artistic modalities. The discussions reveal ways we can connect as a global community to question our current conditions and imagine future potentials. 

For this first installment of ARTIST X ARTIST, Sara Daleiden, Alexandra Dillon,  Deborah Lynn Irmas, and Debra Disman share reflections on the works of artists Dan S. Wang, Gwen Samuels, Pamela Simon-Jensen, and Joan Wulf.

“I’m attracted to the pattern, texture, repetition, modular and grid quality in Joan Wulf’s Stacked Series. The repetition of the burned through marks stands out to me. I respond to the texture, minimal colors and shapes, and repetition so this artwork inspires me in that way. It is fascinating to see the use of fire as a tool, and burning as a process in the work.” 

Untitled is intricate but beautiful, dark and light at the same time. All the movement in black is so interesting, you can’t stop looking at it. Pamela’s work is so inspiring. Because it’s beautiful and elegant but also free and dark at the same time. My work is so different but I am inspired to use the same elements that Pamela uses. She is just a very kind soul and her work is sensitive but has a lot of depth to it.”

Gwen Samuel’s work employs dresses and other female vestiges much the way my work does, but with very different aesthetics. Her explorations of femininity and female power resonate with me. I like the way she incorporates memory into the dresses by sewing together fragments of photographs. Her work is beautiful and finely crafted.  There is an order to it that I find calming. Gwen is a serious artist.  She is extremely dedicated to her practice.  She also has a great attitude and is always willing to help another artist with opportunities and advice.”

Madison, Wisconsin: A City in Nine Objects, a zine by Madison Mutual Drift collective of which Dan is a co-founder and member, is a fantastic portrayal of a city I love back home in Wisconsin which is our political capitol: Madison. The stories about the city from a range of local artists is a window into the complexity of the place around identity, politics, justice and other cultural layers. It is a beautiful print of bold black and red ink on warm, light colored paper which harkens to the university’s colors in this university town aka the state capitol. Very clever! And the stories are tender while also incisive.”

How are you nourishing your soul today?

This week we’re thinking about the role creative action can take in individual wellbeing. We’re starting to hear all over about artists making things, creating new paradigms, and reimagining what the future looks like in this strange, unprecedented time.

So this week we’re bringing to you an artist talk, workshops you can do at home, and an upcoming film festival to nourish your soul.

Don’t forget to check in on Arts Learning Lab @ Home, online live arts workshops with professional artists for kids schooling at home, which will pick up Wed May 6 with jazz percussionist Shirazette Tinnin. 

TUNE IN: Games, an online art film festival for families

Next week, we’re bringing to your home Games, an online screening of artist videos that loop on the hour. Make sure to tune in here. Artists Paul Pescador and Maura Brewer bring together a selection of artworks from Los Angeles and Latin America that consider the theme of play. Today, we are stuck at home, bored and passing time, waiting for life to start up again. The videos in this screening explore the possibility of play in daily life, imagining the world as a space of limitless potential. Expect bouncing balls, fussy puppies and a tropical paradise.   

Artists include Yvonne Buchanan, Micol Hebron, Julie Orser, Ivo Loyola, Junghun Lee, Morgan Waltz, Case Esparros, and Rodri & Lenny.

Live conversation with the curators is on Friday, May 1, 1pmKids and families encouraged to attend to learn more about what a curator is, and how art films are different from commercial films.

Register here.

WATCH NOW: Damir Avdagic’s Zoom Q&A with Curator Frida Cano

Watch artist Damir Avdagic and 18th Street Arts Center’s assistant curator Frida Cano talk about Avdagic’s latest video piece Repriza/Uzvracanje (Reprise/Response) (2018), which was live streamed for 48 hours from April 8 to April 10. This conversation was recorded live on Zoom on Friday April 10, 2020. In this talk, Avdagic talks about his artistic process and influences in dialogue with questions asked by audience members.

WATCH NOW (for families): Mind at Play with Artist Claudia Concha

Mind at Play: The Cocoon (Workshop #1)

Mind at Play: The Butterfly (Workshop #2)

Last week we launched our Arts Learning Lab @ Home with Claudia Concha, our local artist in residence who is an abstract painter. In these workshops, Claudia led us through the process of automatic painting via meditation! Through this process, we envisioned ourselves in our cocoons, safe at home, and imagined our transformation into butterflies while creating an abstract work of art.

If you couldn’t make it to the live workshop over Zoom, don’t worry, we recorded it for you so you can follow along at home, any time you want!

Watch in English here.

Watch in Spanish here.

Click here for the full schedule of Arts Learning Lab @ Home workshops.

Through the end of the school year
Wednesdays and Fridays at 11am via ZOOM

So what happens to housing now?

We’re wondering what happens to housing, public spaces, and development in a post-pandemic LA. So, we decided to revisit some great content about our housing crisis. This week we bring to you “Learning From Los Angeles:  Innovative Housing Design”, an exclusive panel discussion from our archives with panelists Christopher Hawthorne, Angela Brooks from Brooks + Scarpa, and Patrick Tighe from Patrick Tighe Architecture, who collectively tackle the housing and homelessness crisis in LA via design. For a broader historical context, join us in revisiting episodes of one of our favorite podcasts on housing, Paved Paradise

If you’ve got kiddos schooling from home (or just need a moment of creativity), don’t forget to check out Arts Learning Lab @ Home, online live arts workshops with professional artists. 

WATCH: Learning from Los Angeles: Innovative Housing Design

with Christopher Hawthorne, Angela Brooks from Brooks + Scarpa, and Patrick Tighe from Patrick Tighe Architecture.

This sold-out discussion took place in our Airport Gallery on November 12, 2019 as part of Brooks + Scarpa exhibition DENSE-CITY: Housing for Quality of Life and Social Capital, which was also on view. This panel explores, shows examples, and discusses how new sustainable models and current trends in affordable, low-income and market-rate income housing design have produced innovative and cutting edge designs that have improved our cities and urban environments. The seminar also demonstrates how hi-design affordable housing architecture can help create more equitable societies and better cities.  

LISTEN: Paved Paradise Podcast

Paved Paradise, hosted by our very own Sue Bell Yank, explores housing in Los Angeles through a variety of voices. By listening, you’ll learn more about racist housing policies like redlining and racial covenants, anarchist and socialist movements from the early 20th century, what creative placemaking is, what housing as a human right means, and homeslessness issues in Los Angeles.

Listen here.

FOR FAMILIES: Arts Learning Lab @ Home

Arts Learning Lab @ Home
Starting April 15 and running through the end of the school year
Wednesdays and Fridays at 11am via ZOOM
Free with RSVP

Starting April 15 and running through the end of June, Arts Learning Lab @ Home is a series of live online arts classes for kids and families schooling from home. These hands-on artmaking workshops (which will be posted as on-demand videos after each workshop) are led by professional artists in residence at 18th Street as well as members of our national and international artist community. The workshops will be taught in both English and Spanish for those teachers that are bilingual, and will be live translated in both English and Spanish. The workshops cover a range of fun, hands-on, and participatory ideas like meditation through drawing with artist Claudia Concha, storytelling with artist Yrneh Gabon, a rhythm workshop in your kitchen with professional drummer and 2020 Make Jazz Fellow Shirazette Tinnin, and a monster movement workshop with performance artists Beck + Col

Full schedule and recommended ages here.

Transitioning to Virtual Ways of Being

Adhering to social distancing rules necessary to stop the spread of COVID-19 has reshaped our everyday. From sustaining relationships via video phone calls rather than meeting up with friends to attending a livestream rather than an art opening, it seems we’ve all transitioned to a new virtual way of being.

This week we present to you a short documentary film, an invitation to a livestream screening (happening now!) and Q&A with the artist, and Arts Learning Lab @ Home. 

MAMA VIRTUAL | Directed by Jeny Amaya

MAMA VIRTUAL, directed by our communications associate Jeny Amaya, materializes the virtual sphere that transnational mothers construct in order to maintain contact with their children and families back in their home countries. Separated from their children, these Central American mothers externalize this virtual realm through their performance of the “mother’s touch” through the touchscreen of a phone, digital images, phone cards, and other mediated technologies. Watch the other film part of this series here.

 

Due to COVID-19, we had to postpone Danish/Norwegian artist Damir Avdagic’s exhibition at our Atrium Gallery  but we are bringing his film to your home via a 48 hour online livestream screening and Q& A with the artist. The livestream screening of Avdagic’s latest video piece from late 2018 Repriza/Uzvracanje (Reprise/Response) is happening April 8 noon to April 10 noon. The live Zoom Q&A with the artist is happening on April 10, starting at noon. You can find more information on this event here.

Arts Learning Lab @Home is a series of hands-on artist-led workshops held online. Reservation is required. All workshops will be held Wednesdays and Friday at 11am, and will be held in both English (close-captioned in Spanish) and Spanish (close-captioned in English).

Find out how you can participate in the workshops here.

Remembering Kate Johnson (1969-2020)

We want to dedicate a moment to remembering Kate Johnson, our artist in residence of 20 years, who sadly passed away late March 2020.

Read more about the artist, filmmaker, educator, and mentor through the words of her longtime partner Michael J. Masucci on our blog post here.

In addition, EZTV’s webmaster Anais Montoya has created a memorial site for Kate, which you can explore here.   

If you would like to share any recollections you might have of Kate, such as photos, drawings, poems, or videos, please share with Anais so it can be added to Kate’s memorial site at mademoiselleanais4@gmail.com.

Below, check out her interview with Michael as part of our We The Artists campaign in 2016 as well as some of her most recognized works, such as her Emmy award winning documentary Mia, A Dancer’s Journey (2015) (watch the entire film here) , her video and light sculpture Spirits of Morty, and Everywhere in Between (2015), a living interactive art experience that was projected at Bergamot Station and known to be one of Johnson’s most ambitious works (watch the projection at Bergamot Station here).

#WeTheArtists: Kate Johnson & Michael J. Masucci (EZTV)

Mia, A Dancer’s Journey (2015) | Trailer

Spirits of Morty

Everywhere in Between (2015)

Patty Chang | Milk Debt | List of Fears

LA based artist Patty Chang has been creating new video work for 18th Street Arts Center, with scripts she is writing based on fears submitted by people who live or work in the Santa Monica or broader Los Angeles region. The fears will be recited on-camera or live by one or more performers for the artist’s solo exhibition at 18th Street in 2020. This work will be going to other places in the near future, so if you are outside of LA, you are welcome to fill out the form as well – just indicate your current city.

The exhibition was originally planned to open May of 2020, but due to the COVID-19 situation and lockdown as of March, it will open sometime later in 2020 (hopefully summer). In the meantime, Chang has re-opened her call for fears, especially those responsive to our post-pandemic world. She will be making new work in collaboration with performers working remotely and creating new scripts out of these fresh fears. We will take submissions until April 20th.

If you participated in the past, feel free to resubmit your fears, or participate for the very first time. It will really only take 5 minutes and will be totally anonymous in the final script.Thank you for sharing this with us, and we hope it helps you find some solace that great art often arises from times of crisis.

To participate, fill out a survey here: http://bit.ly/milkdebt_survey

DAMIR AVDAGIC |  Repriza/Uzvracanje (Reprise/Response) | Online Livestream Screening

DAMIR AVDAGIC |  Repriza/Uzvracanje (Reprise/Response)
Online Livestream Screening
April 8 at noon through April 10 at noon
Live Zoom chat with the artist at noon on April 10 (RSVP please!)

Tune in at noon on April 8 for an exclusive 48-hour screening of Danish/Norwegian artist Damir Avdagic’s latest video piece from late 2018. In Repriza/Uzvracanje (Reprise/Response) (2018), four people in their mid-60s from ex-Yugoslavia perform a transcribed conversation from the piece Reenactment/Process (2016), in which four people in their mid-20s discuss the inter-generational frictions they experience between themselves and their parents relating to the conflict in ex-Yugoslavia.

Avdagic’s project explores the ways past events transmit between generations and how they affect the present. In the Live Zoom chat at noon on Friday, April 10, Avdagic will show clips of Reenactment/Process, and describe his own process as an artist as part of a moderated conversation and audience Q&A. Please RSVP and join us for this virtual lunch and discussion with participants from around the world – we will send the Zoom link to those that RSVP.

18th Street Arts Center’s Mini Artist Documentaries

Neha Choksi | ELEMENTARY

Clarissa Tossin | 21st Century Wisdom: Healing Frank Lloyd Wright’s Textile Block Houses

Tabari Lake | Make Jazz Fellowship Residency

 

Check out some of our mini artist documentaries on our YouTube and Vimeo channel. Highlighted here is Neha Choksi’s ELEMENTARY, Clarissa Tossin’s 21st Century Wisdom: Healing Frank Lloyd Wright’s Textile Block Houses, and Tabari Lake on his 2019 Make Jazz Fellowship here at 18th Street Arts Center.

Make Jazz Fellow Shirazette Tinnin | LP Music podcast

 

North Carolina native and NYC resident Shirazette Tinnin sits down with Joey DeLeon to chat about her journey as an active clinician, educator, mentor, composer, a certified personal trainer and published author. They explore the origins of her name, her early influences, developing a deep love for African music, and how she ended up in Santa Monica, CA on a three-month “Make Jazz Residency.”

Listen here.

About 18@Home

As a cautionary measure in response to COVID-19 and to protect our artist community who live and work on site at 18th Street Arts Center, we have closed our galleries to the public until further notice. To get your dose of arts and culture at home, we introduce 18@Home, where you can virtually participate and experience our artists’ projects!

This series will be available on our website and across our social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, and more!

At 18th Street Arts Center, we believe art making is an essential component of a vibrant, just and healthy society and that creative action is a vital part of individual wellbeing. We hope 18@Home can offer just that in these times of social distancing.

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